Chemical Hygiene Plan - Hazardous Chemicals/Materials

Definitions of Hazardous Chemicals/Materials

Hazardous chemical means any chemical which is classified as a physical hazard or a health hazard, a simple asphyxiant, combustible dust, pyrophoric gas, or hazard not otherwise classified.

Health hazard means a chemical which is classified as posing one of the following hazardous effects: acute toxicity (any route of exposure); skin corrosion or irritation; serious eye damage or eye irritation; respiratory or skin sensitization; germ cell mutagenicity; carcinogenicity; reproductive toxicity; specific target organ toxicity (single or repeated exposure); or aspiration hazard. The criteria for determining whether a chemical is classified as a health hazard are detailed in Appendix A to §1910.1200—Health Hazard Criteria.

https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/hazcom-appendix-a.html

Any substances which meet any of the following definitions are hazardous chemicals (if applicable, consult your RUA and/or BUA for additional information on hazardous materials not covered in this CHP and their associated PPE requirements):

  1. Carcinogen: Any substance which meets one of the following criteria:

(1) It is regulated by Cal/OSHA as a carcinogen http://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/sb7g16a110.html and http://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/5209.html; or

(2) It is listed under the category, "known to be carcinogens," in the Annual Report on Carcinogens published by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) (1985 edition); or

(3) It is listed under Group 1 ("carcinogenic to humans") by the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs (IARC) (Volumes 1-48 and Supplements 1-8); or

(4) It is listed in either Group 2A or 2B by IARC or under the category, "reasonably anticipated to be carcinogens" by NTP, and causes statistically significant tumor incidence in experimental animals in accordance with any of the following criteria:

A. After inhalation exposure of 6-7 hours per day, 5 days per week, for a significant portion of a lifetime to dosages of less than 10 mg/m3;

B. After repeated skin application of less than 300 mg/kg of body weight per week; or

C. After oral dosages of less than 50 mg/kg of body weight per day.

The EH&S Carcinogen Fact Sheet provides more detailed information about carcinogens.

  1. Corrosive: A substance that causes visible destruction of, or irreversible alterations in, living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact. Common classes of corrosives include strong acids, strong bases, strong dehydrating agents and strong oxidizing agents. The EH&S Corrosives Fact Sheet provides more detailed information about carcinogens.

  2. Flammable (working with more than 1 liter): Any liquid having a flash point below 100 deg. F. (37.8 deg. C.), except any mixture having components with flash points of 100 deg. F. (37.8 deg. C.) or higher, the total of which make up 99 percent or more of the total volume of the mixture.

  3. Highly toxic: A substance falling within any of the following categories:
    (a) A substance that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of 50 milligrams or less per kilogram of body weight when administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.
    (b) A substance that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of 200 milligrams or less per kilogram of body weight when administered by continuous contact for 24 hours (or less if death occurs within 24 hours) with the bare skin of albino rabbits weighing between two and three kilograms each.
    (c) A substance that has a median lethal concentration (LC50) in air of 200 parts per million by volume or less of gas or vapor, or 2 milligrams per liter or less of mist, fume, or dust, when administered by continuous inhalation for one hour (or less if death occurs within one hour) to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.

  4. Irritant: A substance, which is not corrosive, but which causes a reversible inflammatory effect on living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact. A substance is a skin irritant if, when tested on the intact skin of albino rabbits by the methods of 16 CFR 1500.41 for 24 hours exposure or by other appropriate techniques, it results in an empirical score of five or more. A substance is an eye irritant if so determined under the procedure listed in 16 CFR 1500.42 or other appropriate techniques.

  5. Mutagen: Chemicals which give rise to an increased occurrence of mutations in populations of cells and/or organisms. A mutation is defined as a permanent change in the amount or structure of the genetic material in a cell. The term mutation applies both to heritable genetic changes that may be manifested at the phenotypic level and to the underlying DNA modifications when known (including, for example, specific base pair changes and chromosomal translocations). The term mutagenic and mutagen will be used for agents giving rise to an increased occurrence of mutations in populations of cells and/or organisms.

  6. Reactive (any amount): Chemicals that react violently with water or air (also called pyrophoric).

  7. Reproductive toxins: Chemicals which affect the reproductive capabilities including chromosomal damage (mutations) and effects on fetuses (teratogenesis). State of California Prop 65 list of reproductive toxins (and carcinogens).

  8. Sensitizer: A substance that causes a substantial proportion of exposed people or animals to develop an allergic reaction in normal tissue after repeated exposure to the substance.

  9. Toxic. A substance falling within any of the following categories:

(a) A substance that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of more than 50 milligrams per kilogram but not more than 500 milligrams per kilogram of body weight when administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.

(b) A substance that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of more than 200 milligrams per kilogram but not more than 1,000 milligrams per kilogram of body weight when administered by continuous contact for 24 hours (or less if death occurs within 24 hours) with the bare skin of albino rabbits weighing between two and three kilograms each.

(c) A substance that has a median lethal concentration (LC50) in air of more than 200 parts per million but not more than 2,000 parts per million by volume of gas or vapor, or more than two milligrams per liter but not more than 20 milligrams per liter of mist, fume, or dust, when administered by continuous inhalation for one hour (or less if death occurs within one hour) to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.

Following is general hazard information:

Chemical Class Physical and Health Hazards Protective Measures

Acids

  • Acids are corrosive. Contact with skin or eyes may cause disfigurement or blindness.
  • Contact with bases may result in a violent reaction and generate heat, pressure, and toxic byproducts.
  • Wear adequate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including eye and skin protection.
  • Store away from bases and below eye level.
  • Flush exposed skin or eyes with water for 15 minutes.
Bases
  • Bases are corrosive. Contact with skin or eyes may cause disfigurement or blindness.
  • Contact with acids may result in a violent reaction and generate heat, pressure, and toxic byproducts.
  • Wear adequate PPE, including eye and skin protection.
  • Flush exposed skin or eyes with water for 15 minutes.

Carcinogens

  • Can cause cancer in humans or animals.
  • Wear adequate PPE, including eye and skin protection.
  • Use appropriate engineering controls, such as fume hoods.
  • Establish a designated area for use of the material.
  • See the Carcinogen Program on the EH&S Website

Compressed Gases

  • High pressure release can result in injuries.
  • Damaged cylinders or regulators may vent or violently rupture.
  • Secure gas cylinders in place, preferably with two chains per cylinder.
  • Cap cylinders when not in use.

Explosives

  • May violently explode if subjected to heat, shock, or other energy sources.
  • Store in a secured area, limiting access to trained individuals only. Contact EH&S for special storage requirements.
  • Keep away from energy sources.

Flammable Liquids

  • Liquid and/or vapors may burn or explode if exposed to an ignition source.
  • Contact with oxidizers may cause fire or explosion.
  • Vapors are usually toxic.
  • Store in an approved flammable materials cabinet.
  • Keep away from ignition sources and oxidizers.
  • Use appropriate engineering controls, such as fume hoods.
Mutagens
  • Can cause mutations in humans or animals.
  • Wear adequate PPE, including eye and skin protection.
  • Use appropriate engineering controls, such as fume hoods.
  • Establish a designated area for use of the material.

Oxidizers

  • Contact with flammable or combustible material may cause fires, explosions, or violent reactions.
  • Keep away from flammable or combustible materials.

Poisons

  • Inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion can cause poisoning or local or systemic health effects.
  • Wear adequate PPE, including skin and eye protection.
  • Flush exposed skin or eyes with water and seek medical attention.
  • Use appropriate engineering controls, such as fume hoods.

Teratogens

  • Can cause birth defects if exposure occurs to pregnant women.
  • Inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion may cause other adverse health effects.
  • Wear adequate PPE, including eye and skin protection.
  • Use appropriate engineering controls, such as fume hoods.
  • Establish a designated area for use of the material.
  • If you have concerns about teratogens or other reproductive hazards, contact EH&S.

Toxic Gases

  • Release of toxic gas into occupant breathing space may cause adverse health effects or death.
  • Purchases of toxic gases must be pre-approved by EH&S as a requirement of the campus Toxic Gas Program Document
  • Store and use in an approved ventilated enclosure constructed of non-combustible materials.

Comprehensive health and safety information about the chemicals present in the laboratory, such as exposure limits, physical and health hazards, signs and symptoms associated with overexposure, appropriate work practices, equipment for preventing exposure to hazardous chemicals, and proper storage and disposal of hazardous substances can be found at the following links:

If a new chemical is synthesized in the lab all, to the best extent possible, all the same information and training is required as for any other hazardous material.

You can also contact the Campus Chemical Hygiene Officer for additional information (ucbcho@berkeley.edu, 642-3073). See the hard copy flip chart posted in you lab for other lab-specific contact information.