Radiation Safety

Radiation Safety oversees and facilitates the use of radiation sources in research and instruction; helping to ensure safety and regulatory compliance.

Radiofrequency (RF) Radiation Awareness Guide

Office of Environment, Health & Safety

Radiofrequency (RF) radiation, a type of nonionizing radiation, is the energy used to transmit wireless information. At low levels it is not considered a hazard. But at the levels produced by telecommunications equipment, including radio, television, and cellular antennas, RF radiation can pose a health risk for workers. As demand for cellular and wireless services grows, more of these antennas are being placed on rooftops and sides of buildings.

Phil Broughton

Radiation Safety Specialist
Radiation Safety
Laser Safety
LUA

Lab Decommissioning

Lab Equipment Decontamination Protocol Departments must identify equipment desired for release by creating a list for Equipment Management (contact: betshelp@berkeley.edu). Department equipment listings must provide a BETS #, Serial #, building and room number of the equipment intended for release. Departments must also include: equipment history, associated chemical use, biological use or radiation use authorizations - where applicable. Verify and update equipment building, room and description to...

Radiation Safety Information System (RSIS)

The Radiation Safety Information System (RSIS) is a database with information on Radiation Use Authorizations (RUA's). If you are an authorized user on an RUA, you automatically have access to RSIS with your CALNet ID login and can manage the following using RSIS:

view your RUA and print the title page for your door postings make purchase approval requests for radioactive materials make requests to transfer or ship radioactive materials manage your inventory of radioactive materials request a radioactive waste pick-up

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Radiation Safety Self-Survey Form

Office of Environment, Health & Safety

Radiological Use Authorization (RUA) will outline the minimum frequency required for documented surveys, but you are required to perform self-surveys routinely while you work with radioactivity or radiation, as they are the primary tool for detecting contamination and measuring radiation fields.

At a minimum, your survey needs to cover all radioactive work areas, radioactive storage areas, and areas where contamination is a concern (e.g. break rooms, the desks of common radioisotope users, etc.). Be sure to survey different areas each time to ensure you do not miss...